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Operation Motorman's lead investigator said in 2006 that "his team were told not to interview journalists involved.The investigator...accused authorities of being too 'frightened' to tackle journalists." Learning that Steve Whittamore was obtaining information from the police national computer, the Information Commissioner contacted the Metropolitan Police and the Met's anti-corruption unit initiated Operation Glade.The commissioner of London's Metropolitan Police Service (MPS), Sir Paul Stephenson, also resigned.

Upon Rees' release from prison in 2005, he immediately resumed his investigative work for the News of the World, where Andy Coulson had succeeded Rebekah Brooks as editor.In 2002, under the title Operation Motorman, the Information Commissioner's Office, raided the offices of various newspaper and private investigators, looking for details of personal information kept on unregistered computer databases.A number of arrests and convictions followed, most notably of the former News of the World managing editor Andy Coulson.Murdoch and his son, James, were summoned to give evidence at the Leveson Inquiry.Substantial evidence was accumulated that Rees was purchasing information from improper sources and that, amongst others, Alex Marunchak of the News of the World was paying him up to £150,000 a year for doing so.

Jonathan Rees reportedly bought information from former and serving police officers, Customs officers, a VAT inspector, bank employees, burglars, and from blaggers who would telephone the Inland Revenue, the DVLA, banks and phone companies, and deceive them into releasing confidential information.

The News International phone-hacking scandal is a controversy involving the now defunct News of the World and other British newspapers published by News International, a subsidiary of News Corporation.

Employees of the newspaper were accused of engaging in phone hacking, police bribery, and exercising improper influence in the pursuit of stories.

The ICO raided a private investigator named John Boyall, whose specialty was acquiring information from confidential databases.

Glenn Mulcaire had been Boyall's assistant, until the autumn of 2001 when the News of the World's assistant editor, Greg Miskiw gave him a full-time contract to do work for the newspaper.

Documents reportedly held by Scotland Yard show that "Mulcaire did this on the instructions of Greg Miskiw, assistant editor at News of the World and a close friend of Marunchak." The Metropolitan Police Service handled this apparent attempt by agents of the News of the World to interfere with a murder inquiry by having informal discussions with Rebekah Brooks, then editor for the newspaper.