The all new dating game episodes

After two more rounds, one that was stunt-based and another that was question-and-answer, a "couple" was born.

Dates as we know them first became popular about a hundred years ago, when courtship rituals moved outside the home and into the public arena.

According to historian and University of Kansas professor Beth Bailey, the word "date" was first used in the late 1800s in lower-class communities to signify an act of prostitution.

An increase in the activities available to young people played just as important a role in the rise of dating.

The Oxford Companion to United States History explains that "especially in urban areas, new public diversions like dance halls, amusement parks, theaters, and parks enticed courting couples away from the safety of their parlors." Courtship had officially transformed into a public act.

Paul, Minn., where at 15 he discovered a passion for local radio after winning an audition at a local station.

“They wanted a boy and a girl,” he said in a 1992 interview with the Bay Area Radio Digest.

In the 1920s and ‘30s, the concept of "dating and rating" — in which a woman's popularity, or rating, was determined by the amount of dates she had and the quality of men they were with — took hold on college campuses.

In her book From Front Porch to Back Seat: Courtship in Twentieth-Century America, Bailey explains that women would strive to go on multiple dates a week to climb the social ranks. "For women involved in this early model of dating — where success was having two dates in one night, and if you didn't have any, you were sitting in your room with the lights off on Saturday so nobody could tell you weren't popular — they were walking a really difficult line between being what was considered sexually alluring and attractive and not ruining their reputations," Bailey tells me over the phone.

Jim Lange, the first host of the popular game show “The Dating Game,” died Tuesday morning at his home in Mill Valley, Calif., after suffering a heart attack. Though Lange had a successful career in radio, he is best known for his television role on ABC’s “The Dating Game,” which debuted in 1965.

He appeared on the show for more than a decade, charming audiences with his mellifluous voice and wide, easygoing grin and playing host to many celebrity guests.

“They wanted the boy to do sports and the girl to do the dances and stuff that was going on in the Twin Cities — very sexist — and play music once a week.” He hosted that show for two years before attending the University of Minnesota and doing a three-year stint in the Marines, according to the Bay Area Radio Museum.